April 2010


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Before pitching the yeast I took a sample for testing the original gravity (OG). This is roughly a measurement on how much carbon hydrates are left in the brew. The yeast will go and feast (sorry) on the carbon hydrates, leaving the FG (final gravity) lower, and the difference bwteen them will tell us the alcohol strength. Easy, huh?

Now we wait one week, then it’s time to switch to a new fermentation barrel. And after one week more it time to bottle. 🙂

Come on yeast! Do yer thing!

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Now we’ll filter away the hops, then pitch the yeast, stir it vigorously to add air for the yeast, then… We wait.

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When cooked we need to get the temperature down to 20-22 before pitching the yeast. Running cold water to there rescue (we want to do it as fast as possible, infection risk again).

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While the hops cook we’ll sterilize anything that’ll come into contact with the beer cooked, the beer is sensitive to bacteria you see. So say hello to Iodphor (gloves recommended).

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Now we’re cooking. The first hops (cascade) will cook for sixty minutes for bitterness, EKG for twenty and cascade ten for taste and amarillo five for aroma.

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Between 65-78 degrees C we’re dipping the mashed crystal malt. Using a ladies sock no less (clean I might add).

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From top left: 150 gm crystal malt, 15 gm cascade, 15 gm east kent holdings, 10 gm cascade and 20 gm amarillo.

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